Olivo Miotto

Senior Informatics Fellow, Senior Scientist and Fellow
Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford


Olivo Miotto focuses on translating the massive quantities of data produced by sequencing thousands of genomes into meaningful knowledge about the epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum. By analyzing hundreds of thousands of genomic variations in each blood sample, he studies the genetics of parasite populations in four continents, and identifies patterns of evolution associated to responses to drug pressure and other human interventions.

Session: From Single Cell to Population: Impact of Whole-Genome Technology on Tropical Medicine

Thomas Wellems

Chief, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


Dr. Wellems received his M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He completed his internal medicine residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and in 1984 he joined the Division of Intramural Research. He has directed the Malaria Genetics Section since 1991 and has served as chief of the Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research since 2002. Dr. Wellems is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, is a past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and serves on a number of advisory committees for foundations and public-private partnerships, including the Medicines for Malaria Venture.

Session: From Single Cell to Population: Impact of Whole-Genome Technology on Tropical Medicine

Oliver Billker

Senior Group Leader
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute


Oliver develops new genetic technologies to investigate how malaria parasites reproduce in mosquitoes and get transmitted.
Understanding how malaria parasites get transmitted holds one of the keys to preventing the disease from spreading. Since transmission is closely linked with sexual reproduction, it is also at the heart of how the parasites evolve through recombining their genes. How Plasmodium species transition between host and vector and how they use cues from their hosts to time mating and reproduction has always fascinated me.

Session: From Single Cell to Population: Impact of Whole-Genome Technology on Tropical Medicine

Jeffrey Hii

Senior Vector Control Specialist
Malaria Consortium Asia.


Dr Jeffrey Hii is the Senior Vector Control Specialist of Malaria Consortium Asia. From 2003-2012 he was WHO Malaria Scientist in Solomon Islands and Philippines, and was responsible for providing technical support on malaria control and Neglected Tropical Diseases to the Ministry of Health. Dr Hii is an entomologist and has 30 years’ experience in public health and operational research particularly in developing countries working at the district and national levels.

Session: Trans-national research and promoting cross-sector collaboration and socio-ecological systems and resilience approach to vector-borne and parasitic diseases

Pierre Echaubard

Research Director and Project coordinator
Global Health Asia Institute


His research operationalize a rich scientific expertise in disease evolutionary ecology within a Global Health and Sustainability framework, including strong components of public health, community-based action research and medical anthropology. Current projects include: developing integrative research to elucidate liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini transmission dynamics in partnership with the WHO collaborating center on research and control of opisthorchiasis based in Khon Kaen, Northeastern Thailand; a WHO-TDR and ASEAN Environment and Health initiative; and several action-research projects combining medical pluralism, traditional ecological knowledge and resilience theory.

Session: Trans-national research and promoting cross-sector collaboration and socio-ecological systems and resilience approach to vector-borne and parasitic diseases

Kamolchanok Claire Chewapreecha

School of Bioresources and Technology
King Mongkut’s University of Technology


Claire was born in Thailand and is committed to improving public health in Southeast Asia through her research into genetics of bacteria that cause a substantial disease burden in the region. She read Natural Sciences at University of Cambridge (2007-2010) before commencing a PhD at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute with Professors Julian Parkhill and Stephen Bentley (2010-2014). Following a completion of her PhD, she has been very fortunate to be awarded a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship (2015-2019), a 4-year grant that supports her research activity in UK and Thailand.

Session: Melioidosis updates

Direk Limmathurotsakul

Assistant Professor
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit


Dr. Limmathurotsatokal's primary clinical area of expertise is in melioidosis, leptospirosis and ricketsiosis with a specific emphasis on research methodology, epidemiology and statistics, including Bayesian data analysis. He was a key committee member of the World Melioidosis Congress of 2013 and one of the foremost authorities on endemic melioidosis.

Session: Melioidosis updates

Eion West

Associate Professor
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington


Dr. West is a pulmonologist/intensivist, researcher, and educator at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. He sees patients in the Chest Clinic and in the Intensive Care Units at Harborview Medical Center. Dr. West’s research focuses on lung infections and sepsis. He has a particular interest in melioidosis, a serious tropical infection that is endemic in Southeast Asia. He directs the UW’s International Respiratory and Severe Illness Center (INTERSECT).

Session: Melioidosis updates

Susanna J Dunachie

Associate Professor
Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford


Professor Susanna Dunachie works on tropical diseases such as melioidosis, scrub typhus and vivax malaria. Melioidosis is a bacterial disease that results in pneumonia, liver and splenic abscesses and septic shock. The disease can reactivate after a latent period and is inherently resistant to many standard antibiotics. People continue to die around the world from this infection for which there is no vaccine. Understanding the disease is therefore crucial.

Session: Melioidosis updates

Kevin C. Kobylinski

Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS)


My research interests are heavily rooted in medical entomology and focused on developing and characterizing novel vector control interventions. My primary research interest for the last several years has been characterizing the utility of ivermectin mass drug administration (MDA) for malaria parasite transmission suppression. Ivermectin is a broad spectrum anthelminthic used to treat and eliminate numerous neglected tropical diseases in humans. Ivermectin is an extremely safe drug used in onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis elimination campaigns and given to more than 300 million people annually. Ivermectin at human and animal relevant concentrations has been shown to kill all Anopheles vectors tested to date, covering most of the primary malaria vectors across the globe. In addition to the direct killing effect, ivermectin has sublethal effects including inhibition of re-feeding, inhibition of sporogony, and reduction in fecundity. Field studies in West Africa demonstrate that ivermectin MDAs can reduce longevity of wild Anopheles and reduce P. falciparum transmission burden. Clinical trials are underway to assess the safety and efficacy of ivermectin with various artemisinin combination therapies for possible use in MDAs. Field studies of ivermectin MDA are being initiated in Southeast Asia to assess capabilities to suppress P. vivax and P. falciparum transmission.

Session: Malaria elimination towards eradication in 21st Century

Borimas Hanboonkunupakarn

Lecturer
Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


 

Session: Malaria elimination towards eradication in 21st Century

Kesinee Chotivanich

Professor
Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


Professor of Clinical Tropical Medicine Dr. Kesinee Chotivanich’s background is in pathobiology with particular expertise in cell and tissue culture and the pharmacodynamics of antimalarial drugs. Dr. Chotivanich has been working on two main areas of research: the pathophysiology of malaria infections, and detection of anti-malarial resistance parasites. The method of identification of artemisinin resistance P. falciparum was firstly developed in her lab. She has published over 100 publications, many of which are leading research achievements in the field of malaria studies, such as detection of artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum, and transmission-blocking activities of antimalarial drugs.

Session: Malaria elimination towards eradication in 21st Century

Marcus Lee

Group Leader
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute


Marcus Lee is interested in the molecular basis of drug resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and in developing molecular genetics approaches to interrogate gene function.

Session: Malaria elimination towards eradication in 21st Century

Akira Ito

Professor
Faculty of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University


Emeritus Professsor Ito is a parasitologists at the Asahikawa Medical University, specialising in Cestode zoonoses, mainly echinococcosis, cysticercosis, taeniasis; from field to the laboratory.

Session: Investigating neglected infectious diseases at the interface between ecology and anthropology

Abigaël Pesses

Deputy Director
IRASEC


Abigaël Pesses is an anthropologist graduate from the University Paris-Ouest Nanterre in France. Her major research interest focuses on the conceptions and the politics of nature in hindo-buddhist societies: cosmologies, connections between animism and buddhism, environmentalist movements and preservation policies. She is now conducting research on the issues of health and environement, and the links between biodiversity and cultural multiplicity. She is the author of several articles on relations between societies and environments among Karen highlanders of Thailand. She is also involved in issues concerning the use of the Internet in various context : blogs, social networks, scientific editing and Digital Humanities. Since 2014, she is deputy director of the Institute of Research on Contemporary Southeast Asia (IRASEC), a French research center based in Bangkok. The main objective of the Irasec is to extend knowledge of the South-East Asian region and to analyze the major developments that affect, together or separately, the ASEAN countries. Abigael Pesses coordinate research programs, scientific cooperation with Southeast Asian universities, and publications mostly in French and English. She currently managing an Open access project on Irasec on the scientific European platform

Session: Investigating neglected infectious diseases at the interface between ecology and anthropology

Kittipong Chaisiri

Scientist
Department of Helminthology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


Although not working solely with helminths, Dr. Kittipong Chaisiri sees helminths playing an important role in answering his main research question on diversity: from ecological parasitism in a changing environment, diversity of host and parasite, habitat, as well as cultural diversity and local perception in human community. He wants to find out how biodiversity links to people’s health, particularly on a local scale.
Dr. Kittipong’s current research focuses on rodent-borne diseases, including microparasites (e.g., bacterial and viral diseases) and macroparasites (e.g., helminths and ectoparasites) carried by wild rodents in Southeast Asia.

Session: Investigating neglected infectious diseases at the interface between ecology and anthropology

Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky

Senior Researcher
CIRAD, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University


Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky is a tropical ecologist (MSc, PhD, HDR) and a veterinarian (DVM), working as senior researcher for the International Centre for Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD). He is currently based in Bangkok (Kasetsart University, Adj. Professor with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine), attached to GREASE network (www.grease-network.org/). Michel has a broad interest for all aspects of Man-Nature interactions, with a special emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches of wildlife-livestock-human interactions. His current research interests include ecological and epidemiological interactions between wildlife and livestock, and integrated participatory management of conservation areas and their peripheries. After more than a decade in Southern Africa, he is currently coordinating with KU a project funded by TICA and developing projects in Thailand/SE Asia.

Session: Investigating neglected infectious diseases at the interface between ecology and anthropology

Stéphane Rennesson

Statutory researcher
IRASEC


After a long participative fieldwork in Thailand, Stéphane Rennesson has written an in-depth ethnography of the world of Thai Boxing, a major cultural industry of the Kingdom. After that and as an anthropologist he has been studying other very much structured games that are at the center of environmental issues in Thailand. He notably focused on competitions that require uncanny collaborations between human and various animals (beetle and fish fights, bird signing contests). Working for French national center for scientific research (CNRS) since 2009, he also has taught anthropology of communication at the Institut d’Etudes Politique of Paris. Based in Bangkok at IRASEC since January 2017, he carries on a study on the recent developments of the mythic and ritual complex around the figure of Nagas in Northeastern Thailand at the crossroad of anthropology of nature and anthropology of religion.

Session: Investigating neglected infectious diseases at the interface between ecology and anthropology

Cherry Lim

Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU)


Cherry Lim is a DPhil student working under Dr. Direk Limmathurotsakul. She is working on epidemiology of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. She participated in a project on estimating the number of deaths due to antibiotic-resistant infections in Thailand. This work was recently published in eLife Journal.

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Chakkaphan Runcharoen

Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


Mr Chakkaphan Runchaoren is a PhD stuent at the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University under the advisory of Assoc. Prof. Dr. Narisara Chantratita. He is presently working on his thesis titled, “Molecular analysis of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from patients, animal farms and the environment”.

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Maliwan Hongsuwan

Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit


 

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Thomas Althaus

Clinical Trial Coordinator
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU)


Thomas Althaus is a medical doctor with a specialisation in Public Health and Infectious Diseases. He is particularly interested in the control of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance.
He is currently based in Bangkok where he coordinates a multi-country project in Southeast Asia, focusing on antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this study is to reduce irrational use of antibiotics in febrile patients attending primary care in low-resources settings through the use of point-of-care biomarkers.

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Rachel Greer

Senior Scientist
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU)


Rachel Greer is a UK trained GP currently working in Chiangrai, Thailand with Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit.
Interests include community medicine, targeting antibiotics and using research to help vulnerable people groups.

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Jiraboon Tosanguan

Research Assistant
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU)


Jiraboon Tosanguan is currently a Research Assistant and PhD Student in the Mathematical and Economic Modelling (MaEMOD) Group at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU) based in Bangkok. His work focuses on the development of infectious disease modelling and evaluating the impact of interventions on reducing the burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) which is a major public health concern in the context of developing countries as well as globally.
Before Joining MORU in 2016, he worked at the International Health Policy Program (IHPP), a health policy research arm of the Thai Ministry of Public Health, where he was involved in research related to health policy analysis, burden of diseases, and health technology assessment (HTA). He also has previous experience with the pharmaceutical industry working as the Market Access and External Affairs Manager after his role at the Ministry.

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Eileen Dunne

Medical Epidemiologist
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Dr. Dunne has conducted significant research on HIV and other STDs for over 19 years. She has been the PI on a number of important studies including clinical trials of biomedical HIV preventions strategies in Bangkok, a study on impact of acyclovir on genital shedding of HIV in HIV and HSV-2 co-infected women in northern Thailand, evaluation of HPV vaccine impact in the US and other settings, and assessments of self-collection for STIs in males; she has over 90 peer-reviewed publications. Most recently, in collaboration with the Thailand Ministry of Public Health and WHO, Dr. Dunne has led development of the Enhanced Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (EGASP) in Thailand. She was on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices HPV Vaccine Workgroup from 2005-2014 and helped lead development of general and specific recommendations for vaccine use, and research questions on HPV epidemiology and vaccine impact. Dr. Dunne led the development of the STD Treatment Guidelines on HPV and Genital warts in 2006, 2010 and 2014.

Session: Antimicrobial Resistance

Atsushi Yamanaka

Assistant Professor
Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases , Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


 

Session: Antibodies against Arboviruses

Pannamthip Pitaksajjakul

Assistant Professor
Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


 

Session: Antibodies against Arboviruses

Takeshi Kurosu

NIID, Japan


Takeshi Kurosu, D.V.M., Ph.D. is a research scientist at the Department of Virology 1, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan. He was a former Assistant Professor at the Osaka University Research Institute for Microbial Diseases. His research interests are dengue virus diseases, arbovirus disease, vector-borne disease, and hemorrhagic fever. Currently, he works in several projects on dengue, viral hemorrhagic fever, and sever fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

Session: Antibodies against Arboviruses

Tamaki Okabayashi

Assistant Professor
Miyazaki University, Japan


Dr Okabayashi is a member of Department of Veterinary Medicine and also the Center for Animal Disease Control (CADIC) at Miyazaki University, Japan. Dr Okabayashi used to be a key member of the Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases (MOCID) based at the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University.

Session: Antibodies against Arboviruses

Paul J. Brett

Associate Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine


Dr. Paul J. Brett is an Associate Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine. He received his B.Sc. from the University of Victoria and his Ph.D. from the University of Calgary. In addition to conducting postdoctoral training at University College London and at Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID/NIH he also has several years experience working in the biotech sector. Dr. Brett has served as a peer reviewer/panel member for the NIAID/NIH, the German Research Foundation, the United Kingdom Medical Research Council and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency as well as serves as an ad hoc peer reviewer for a number of journals including Vaccine, Clinical and Vaccine Immunology and Infection and Immunity. Research in his laboratory is focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms used by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei to cause disease in humans and animals as well as the development of polysaccharide-based vaccines for immunization against melioidosis and glanders. Dr. Brett has over 20 years experience working with pathogenic Burkholderia species and has published over 50 peer reviewed articles/book chapters related to these organisms.

Session: Current Research on Microbial infections in the Tropics

Dorothee Misse

Institute of Research for Development
Infectious Diseases and Vectors: Ecology, Genetics, Evolution and Control (MIVEGEC)


Dorothée Misse (PhD, HDR) works on the pathogenesis of emerging viruses with a focus on factors induced by virus–host interactions. Working on a number of infectious agents including HIV-1, DENV, CHIKV, HCV, HBV, and the H5N1 virus has given her a broad understanding of viral infection.

Session: Current Research on Microbial infections in the Tropics

Yong Poovorawan

Professor
Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University


Yong is a medical professor in pediatric hepatology at the Faculty of Medicine of Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He is widely noted for his research in the fields of pediatric hepatology, viral hepatitis and virology, and is regarded as a subject expert on the H5N1 avian influenza virus in Thailand.

Session: Current Research on Microbial infections in the Tropics

Punnee Pitisuttithum

Professor
Faculty of Tropical Medicine


Dr. Punnee Pitisuttithum is Professor in the Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, Head of the Vaccine Trial Centre and Deputy Dean for Translational Medicine and Innovation. She has extensive experience in designing and implementing clinical and vaccine trials and has been widely recognized both in Thailand and internationally for this work, with numerous awards including the Award of Most Outstanding Researcher in Medical Science 2015 from National Research Council of Thailand, the 2013 Mahidol University Award for Outstanding Research in recognition of the paper “Vaccination with ALVAC and AIDSVAX to Prevent HIV-1 Infection in Thailand”, and an award in 2010 from Mahidol University for “Highest citation count for research papers in 2005-2009” based on the SCOPUS database.

Session: Challenges: Academia-Industry Collaboration in Development of Drugs and Vaccines

Francisco Javier-Gamo

Director
Malaria DPU, Diseases of the Developing World, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Spain
Visiting Senior Director Director Drug Discovery, Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV)


Javier Gamo completed his PhD working in microbial biochemistry and molecular biology at the IIB (UAM-CSIC) at Madrid. He joined GlaxoSmithkine in 1995 and since then has leaded different projects in the drug discovery area. In 2002 he started to work in the GSK antimalarial program developed in collaboration with the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV). Since then, he has leaded in different antimalarial target based programs. In 2008 he started to lead a program based on phenotypic screening for antimalarial lead discovery that carry out the identification of all the antimalarial compounds present in the GSK screening collection after testing more than 2 million compounds (TCAMS). As Project Leader of the project in GSK, Javier was in charge of the deployment of this set of compounds to fill internal pipeline and to share TCAMS among the broader antimalarial community accordingly with the Open Innovation approach GSK initiated some years ago. During the last years Javier has been leading a miniportfolio of antimalarial projects in collaboration with MMV and managing a pipeline of drug discovery project across different neglected diseases in collaboration with Wellcome Trust. Since June Javier is working as Visiting Senior Director Drug Discovery at MMV leading some drug discovery programs and scientific platforms to facilitate identification of new antimalarial drugs.

Session: Challenges: Academia-Industry Collaboration in Development of Drugs and Vaccines

Nelson Michael

Director
Military HIV Vaccine Research Program


Nelson L. Michael, M.D., Ph.D is the Director of the US Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), an international HIV vaccine research program that successfully integrates HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment.

Session: Challenges: Academia-Industry Collaboration in Development of Drugs and Vaccines

Anchalee Varangrat

Deputy Team Lead, Behavioral Science Team
Thailand MOPH- US CDC Collaboration


Anchalee Varangrat is Research Implementation Unit Lead of Behavioral and Clinical Research Section, CDC’s HIV/STD Research Program in Thailand. Mrs Anchalee earned M.A. degree in Demography from The Australia National University in Australia and B.A. in Political Sciences from Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
Mrs. Anchalee joined CDC in 2003 as the Deputy Team Lead, Behavioral Science Team.

Session: Involving the Community is Key to Effective Research: The HIV Prevention Research Experience

Wipas Wimonsate

Clinical Research Specialist
Thailand MOPH- US CDC Collaboration


A former architect/city planner/environmental scientist who turned his attention to social science and medical research for over ten years. He has published some manuscripts and presented at several international conferences. His goal is to find the way to create a strong and sustainable community movement for the people and by the people.

Session: Involving the Community is Key to Effective Research: The HIV Prevention Research Experience

Udom Likhitwonnawut

Independent consultant
AVAC (Global Advocacy for HIV Prevention)


Udom has been working as a consultant for AVAC in Thailand on community engagement on HIV research for the past 6 years. He is also a consultant on CAB constitution for the Community Engagement team of the Retrovirology Department of Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) since 2010. His work for AVAC is to promote community participation in HIV research and advocacy for GPP implementation in the country. In addition he is a member of the National Subcommittee on HIV Vaccine Development and the National Subcommittee on Biomedical HIV Prevention representing the Thai NGO Coalition on AIDS (TNCA), the national umbrella organization for HIV/AIDS-related organizations. He is one of the founders of Thailand national CAB (NCAB) on HIV research which was formed in 2013 by members of 5 existing institutional CABs in the country.

Session: Involving the Community is Key to Effective Research: The HIV Prevention Research Experience

Arturo Reyes Sandoval

Associate Professor
Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford


In recent years, I have contributed to the development of one of the leading vaccine candidates for P. falciparum malaria that targets the parasite at the liver, where it stops and multiplies before entering the blood (pre-erythrocytic or liver-stage vaccines). This strategy uses novel recombinant viral vectors (ChAd63 and Modified Vaccinia Ankara, MVA) expressing the recombinant antigen TRAP. By exploiting their extraordinary ability to stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune response –antibodies and T cells-, we can elicit immune responses able to provide outstanding protection in a sporozoite challenge that mimics the infection process by which a mosquito inoculates parasites into a mammalian host.

Session: Progress towards developing vaccines against Plasmodium vivax

Wang Nguitragool

Assistant Professor
Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University


As a member of the Malaria group of the Department of Molecular Tropical Medicine and Genetics, Dr. Wang Nguitragool is leading a team of researchers and students to investigate Plasmodium vivax biology and transmission. Using tools in genetic engineering and protein biochemistry, Dr. Nguitragool’s laboratory team focuses its research effort to better understand how P. vivax invades reticulocytes and how to block this essential step in the parasite life cycle. In addition, Dr. Nguitragool is also leading molecular epidemiological projects to track the current trend of malaria in western Thailand.

Session: Progress towards developing vaccines against Plasmodium vivax

Patchanee Chootong

Assistant Professor
Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University


My research interests focus on understanding natural immunity against P. vivax during infection. A lacking knowledge of naturally acquired immunity and its association with parasite polymorphism in malaria endemic areas is a major obstacle for vaccine development. Thus, my first research project is to comprehensively understanding both antibody response and cellular immunity against blood stage P. vivax parasite as it is anti-disease immunity. Duffy Binding protein (DBP) is a high potential blood stage vaccine candidate because it is important parasite ligand for erythrocyte binding. However, high polymorphism of this protein antigen and strain-specific immunity are limitation for vaccine design. To develop vivax vaccine in Thai population, DBP polymorphisms among Thai vivax isolates and its association with immunity as well as the long-lived of antibody and memory B cell response are studied.

Session: Progress towards developing vaccines against Plasmodium vivax

Wai-Hong Tham

Associate Professor
Walter+Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research


Assoc. Prof. Wai-Hong Tham’s research group studies how malaria parasites enter red blood cells and evade the immune system to establish successful infection and tries to decipher the interactions between parasite and human proteins that allow malaria parasites to enter into red blood cells and to actively escape from immune attack. Their goal is to identify new ways to prevent blood stage infection, thereby preventing malaria disease.

Session: Progress towards developing vaccines against Plasmodium vivax

Joel Tarning

Professor
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit


Joel Tarning is the head of the Clinical Pharmacology group focusing on bioanlytical method development, drug measurements in biological fluids and pharmacometric research. His research interest includes dose-optimisation using novel pharmacometric modelling approaches. His particular research interest includes antimalarial treatment in children and pregnant women.

Session: Research Data Sharing Controversy

Suttipat Srisutham

Project Coordinator
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit


My current position is Project Coordinator at Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University. I work with MORU and WWARN, collecting data on regional antimalarial resistance both to ensure the efficacy of malaria treatments, and to provide health officials with key surveillance information. With grant funding from the 5% Initiative, we are conducting a prevalence survey of resistance markers in the Greater Mekong Subregion. My main duties include extracting and mapping prevalence data on markers from published articles.

Session: Research Data Sharing Controversy

Phaik Yeong Cheah

Associate Professor
Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit


Dr Phaik Yeong Cheah, an Associate Professor of Oxford University is based in Bangkok at the Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme. She is currently the head of a new department, called the Department of Bioethics and Engagement. The department works on ethical issues arising from conducting research and working with vulnerable populations such as children, pregnant women, migrants as well as other disadvantaged and hard-to-reach populations.

Session: Research Data Sharing Controversy

John Adams

Professor
University of South Florida


John H. Adams, PhD joined the University of South Florida College of Public Health Global Health Infectious Diseases Research program in June 2007 and previously was at the University of Notre Dame for 16 years. He was trained in basic parasitology (BA 1978, Hendrix College; PhD 1985, University of Illinois; 1986-87, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Queensland) and in molecular approaches to malaria at National Institutes of Health, 1987-1991. His research program studies malaria parasite biology with the expectation that a better understanding of Plasmodium biology will enable developing better ways to control malaria through vaccines, drugs and other prevention strategies.

Session: Antimalarial drug discovery and resistance

Chairat Uthaipibull

Senior Researcher
BIOTEC


Chairat Uthaipibull is currently a senior researcher at the Protein-Ligand Engineering and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Medical Molecular Biology Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC). During 1989-1996, he received the Monbusho Japanese Government Scholarship to study for his B.Sc. and M.Sc. at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Japan where has was trained in Immunology. He returned to Thailand and joined BIOTEC in May 1996 as a researcher in the laboratory of Professor Yongyuth Yuthavong before continuing his research journey by receiving the Royal Thai Government Scholarship in 1997 for Ph.D. training on malaria vaccine development at the world-famous Medical Research Council (MRC) National Institute for Medical Research in Mill Hill, London, United Kingdom.

Session: Antimalarial drug discovery and resistance

Ric Price

Professor
Menzies School of Health Research


Professor Ric Price is an infectious disease and general physician on the staff at the Royal Darwin Hospital. He holds a dual academic affiliation as professor of global health at the Menzies School of Health Research and professor of tropical medicine at the Centre of Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, UK. His translational research program focuses on improving the diagnosis and management of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections through a research agenda that spans clinical studies, epidemiology, health economics, pathophysiology, immunology, in vitro studies and molecular biology.

Session: Antimalarial drug discovery and resistance

Stephan Karl

Research Officer
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute For Medical Research


 

Session: Extending the Frontiers of Vector Control

Nguyen Tran Hien

Professor
National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology


 

Session: Extending the Frontiers of Vector Control

Waraporn Juntarajumnong

Assistant Professor
Department of Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kasetsart University


Dr. Waraporn Juntarajumnong is lecturer at the Department of Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture, KU and her interest focus on the molecular and biochemical characterization of pyrethroid resistance in dengue vectors. Since 2010 she is-leading a research programme on “Insecticide resistance of Dengue vectors in Thailand” in cooperation with the Bureau of Vector Borne Diseases, MOPH, and Thailand Research Fund (TRF). She has established strong partnership with the CNRS-LECA and IRD-MIVEGEC team through the STOPVEC programme and the PHC-SIAM project (2013-2014) that aims at a better understanding of the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in Ae. Aegypti.

Session: Extending the Frontiers of Vector Control

Kiaran Kirk

Dean
College of Science, Australian National University


Kiaran Kirk is the Dean of the College of Science at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. His lab has a longstanding interest in the membrane transport proteins of the malaria parasite, focusing both on their potential as antimalarial drug targets and their role in antimalarial drug resistance.

Session: Red Queen’s Race: Malaria Drug Resistance vs. Drug Development

Pradipsinh Rathod

Professor
University of Washington


The major theme of my research over 30 years is to improve on our knowledge-base for making malaria therapeutics. We started with characterizing de novo pyrimidine metabolism in Plasmodium falciparum in 1982, and in 2011 received the Medicines for Malaria Venture Project of the Year (with Meg Phillips) for development of triazolopyrimidine inhibitors of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. The lead molecule is in clinical tests in humans.

Session: Red Queen’s Race: Malaria Drug Resistance vs. Drug Development

John Cherrie

Professor
The Institute of Occupational Medicine


John is Principal Scientist within the Research Division of The Institute of Occupational Medicine. He is a former President of the British Occupational Hygiene Society. His research interests include human exposure assessment, environmental and occupational epidemiology, natural and synthetic fibres – including asbestos, dermal exposure to chemicals and dermatitis, and particulate air pollution. He also prepares medico-legal reports in relation to dust and chemical exposures, particularly to do with occupational cancer risks.

Session: Environmental Health, Toxicology, Biotechnology

Suthirat Kittipongvises

Lecturer
Environmental Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University


Dr. Suthirat Kittipongvises is currently a lecturer at Environmental Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University (ERIC), Thailand. She earned a PhD in Sustainability Science from the Graduate Program in Sustainability Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, the University of Tokyo, Japan in 2013. She also has received her master degree on Environmental Engineering and Management, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Thailand in 2008. Her research focuses on climate change mitigation, GHGs quantification, carbon capture and storage, and so on.

Session: Environmental Health, Toxicology, Biotechnology

Pongrama Ramasoota

Associate Professor
Faculty of Tropical Medicine


Assoc. Prof. Ramasoota is Director of Center of Excellence for Antibody Research (CEAR) and Head of the Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University. One of his present research projects is the production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies against dengue virus at industrial scale under GMP condition which is funded by National Research Council of Thailand.

Session: Environmental Health, Toxicology, Biotechnology

Anamai Thetkathuek

Associate Professor
Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University


Dr Anamai Thetkathuek is Associate Professor at Burapha University, Thailand. She earned her Ph.D in Tropical Medicine at the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University. She has a number of publications and textbooks under her name. She has also reviewed several articles and research papers in Thai.

Session: Environmental Health, Toxicology, Biotechnology

Ting Hui Ng

Postdoctoral Fellow, Animal Systematics Research Unit, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University


I study the biodiversity, introduction history, and ecology of freshwater mollusks and other aquatic invasive species. I am currently a postdoctoral fellow at Chulalongkorn University, investigating the current diversity and distribution of introduced freshwater snails, and in particular, looking at the overlap between native and invasive apple snails, Ampullariidae, in Thailand.

Session: Environmental Health, Toxicology, Biotechnology